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2 Jake Garzio Drive
Ewing, NJ 08628

The 2020 Census, Ewing Township and You

Help shape Ewing’s (and New Jersey’s) future with your response

Census piechartThis year in 2020 the U.S. government will begin its decennial count of the population.  Sometime in mid-March you should receive an invitation to complete the 2020 Census in the mail.  With your response you will continue a process that first began in 1790 and has occurred every ten years since on years ending in “0.”  The United States census is constitutionally mandated and attempts to count every person living in the U.S. once, and only once, where they live.  Your response is requested by phone, by mail or online. 

It is vitally important that each Ewing resident is accounted for in the Census.

What’s at Stake

Fair Representation

The results of the census are used for the reapportionment of seats for the House of Representatives for the coming decade.  Census results will determine how many seats New Jersey is entitled to in the House and will help ensure that any redistricting of congressional districts which takes place after the census will be fair.  Officials will also redraw the boundaries of legislative districts for representation in the state Assembly. 

How does the 2020 Census Affect Representation? 

Funding

You’ve probably heard that (overall) New Jersey is a “donor” state which means that New Jerseyans send to Washington more funds than are returned to us in the form of federal funds, grants, and support the state, counties and communities.  That money is spent on hospitals, schools, roads, public works, and other vital programs including school lunches, plans for highways, support for firefighters and families in need…   The Decennial Census provides the benchmark data for how the funds are distributed.  An accurate count is vital in guaranteeing that funds are fairly returned to New Jersey residents through these programs. 

How the Census Affects Federal Funding

Data Analysis

Census data is analyzed by local government, universities, non-profits, the business community to inform their research and planning.  Governments use the census for public safety and emergency preparedness.  Businesses use the data for market research and decisions such as where to build plants, offices and stores which create jobs.  The data is used for infrastructure and transportation planning, medical research, and much more. 

What You Need to Know

  • If you live in the United States, you are required by law to complete the 2020 Census.
  • In 2020, for the first time ever, the U.S. Census Bureau will accept responses online.  You still have the option of responding by phone or mail if that is your preference.
  • You will be asked a few simple questions such as name, age, date of birth, sex, race, relationships, and the number of people who live in your home, including children.  The goal is to count people once (and only once) where they live on Census Day (April 1st). 
  • They will inquire about national origin (Latino, Hispanic or Spanish) to monitor compliance with anti-discrimination provisions, such as under the Voting Rights Act and the Civil Rights Act. 
  • They ask whether a home is owned or rented to create statistics about home ownership and renters.  This serves as an indicator of the nation’s economy and helps in administering housing programs and informing planning decisions.
  • You will NOT be asked to supply your Social Security number, bank or credit card numbers, for money or donations, or anything related to political parties.
  • Count everyone under your roof as of April 1, 2020.  If there are special circumstances such as students, foreign citizens, US military personnel, snow birds, etc. please check the Special Circumstances section on the Census Bureau’s Who to Count page.
  • The Census Bureau will ask for a phone number in case they need to contact you.  They will never share that number and will contact you only if needed for official Census Bureau business.
  • Your answers to the 2020 Census are safe, secure and protected by federal law.  Your answers can only be used to produce statistics.  They cannot be used against you in any way by any government agency: not by the FBI, the CIA, DHS, or ICE!  By law, all responses to the U.S. Census Bureau household and business surveys are kept completely confidential. 
  • The Census Bureau has a robust cyber-security program that incorporates industry best practices and federal security standards for encrypting data.

Census Timeline

  • March 12 – 20: You should receive an invitation to respond online to the census questionnaire.
  • March 16 -24: A reminder letter will be sent out.
  • March 25 – April 3: You will receive a reminder postcard if you haven’t responded yet.
  • April 1st: Census Day observed.
  • April 8 – 16: Another reminder letter and a paper questionnaire.
  • April 20 -27: A final reminder postcard before they follow up in person.
  • May – July: Census takers will begin visiting homes that haven’t responded to the 2020 Census to help make sure that everyone is counted. If someone comes to your home to collect information for the 2020 Census, check to make sure that they have a valid ID badge, with their photograph, a U.S. Department of Commerce watermark, and an expiration date. Census workers may also carry Census Bureau bags and other equipment with the Census Bureau logo.
  • 2020 Census Job Opportunities
  • December: The Census Bureau will deliver apportionment counts to the President and Congress as required by law.

Your response matters

We ask that over the next few months you complete your census information and help get the word out about the importance of a complete census for Ewing Township.  Look for more information and reminders here on the Ewing Township website, on our Facebook page, and posters around town as we work to ensure that every Township resident is counted.

 

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